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This week I speak about the challenges I’m faced with as a small practice owner. Sometimes the administrative tasks that I need to solve stress me out, and I am still working on improving my problem-solving skills and coping mechanisms.

I often get complaints from my patients about the fact that I sometimes step out of the practice. It’s impossible for me to always be there, sometimes I need to take care of certain things.

I also recently remembered how important it is to observe your office from the patient’s point of view. I strongly suggest you give it a try and do so periodically.

We’ve been having some problems with the dental camera and with the website. If you know a good web developer or a long-lasting, top quality dental (video) camera, get in touch with me at drkirk@businessofdentistrypodcast.com. I really appreciate your help.

The challenges we are all faced with in our professional careers are part of our journeys. And I’ve learned to care more about my journey than about my destination.

Key takeaways:

Observe your practice from the patient’s point of view
Issues with our camera and with the website
It’s all about the journey, not the destination

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Full show notes at http://businessofdentistrypodcast.com/
Being out of the office and observing your practice from the patient’s point of view
Oftentimes when I am out of the office, my patients seem to get irritated. It’s a bit like they would like me to be in the office the whole time. Of course, things happen and sometimes I need to get out.

However, I also want to keep my patients happy. I want to make sure that my customer service is as good as it can be. I’m sure you’ve all experienced that. How do you manage it? I haven’t been able to come up with a solution so far. Send me your suggestions and experiences. I truly appreciate your feedback!

Last week I underwent a small medical procedure, during which I had to be sedated. This was really interesting for me from the patient experience point of view, because I hadn’t been on the other side for a while now. I was lucky to have received top-notch treatment and attention.

This reminded me of the fact that it’s good to sit down in my dental chair from time to time and just look around at the office from the patient’s perspective. As doctors, we often forget to check the details from a patient’s point of view. We get caught up in our clinical work, and we lose track of the rest.

My suggestion is that you take a stroll through your office and notice things from the customer’s point of view. It will help you discover what needs to be improved or changed.
Issues with our camera and with the website
Three years ago we bought a Shofu Dental Eye camera for surgical pictures. We started having problems with it and tried to have it repaired. It’s out of warranty now, but I expected it to last longer than three years.

So I reach out to you: does any of you also own a Shofu Dental Eye camera? Do you have any problems with it? Also, if you are using a different brand, and you are happy with it, please send me a message. I’m also interested in video cameras for dental practices. Any help is extremely appreciated.

We’ve also had some trouble with our website. I hired someone to build and host our website, and a few months ago she told us that she no longer wants to be part of the hosting business. She transferred everything over, but I later realized was that our website had been offline for about three weeks. There must have been some sort of glitch during the transfer.

I only found out that the website was down because Google Places sent me a notification. By the way, if you haven’t yet signed up for Google Places, you might want to consider it.

We are now thinking of redesigning or redoing our website completely because we’ve had the same layout for about five years.